Friday, February 24, 2017

Welcoming Shabbat with Lecha Dodi Version of John Legend's "All of Me"


This is a new version of the Bo'i B'shalom verse of Lecha Dodi by Harp and Love – a musical group from Israel that specializes in wedding music. 

It's set to the music of John Legend's song All of Me. The Hebrew text and English translation appear below the video.

Enjoy and Shabbat Shalom! 


A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.



בּֽוֹאִי בְשָׁלוֹם עֲטֶרֶת בַּעְלָהּ. גַּם בְּשִׂמְחָה וּבְצָהֳלָה.
תּוֹךְ אֱמוּנֵי עַם סְגֻּלָּה. בּֽוֹאִי כַלָּה, בּֽוֹאִי כַלָּה:
לְכָה דוֹדִי לִקְרַאת כַּלָּה. פְּנֵי שַׁבָּת נְקַבְּלָה:


Come now, Shabbat, the day divine,
Come in joy, let your brightnes​s shine.
Come to the people which greets you with pride,
Come in peace, Shabbat Bride.




Thursday, February 23, 2017

Throwback Thursday Comedy Special: Milton Berle Plays Auntie Mildred on the Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour


Today is another Throwback Thursday and we're riding the nostalgia train back to September 1959 for a clip from Episode 1 in the third season of the Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, a spinoff from I Love Lucy.

In this episode, in order to get Milton Berle to perform at a benefit at Little Ricky's school, Lucy uses Ricky's name to spark his attention. When Ricky catches her, Lucy must act in secret and decides to visit Mr. Berle's office. 

At the office, she overhears Milton's agent saying that Mr. Berle needs a secluded place to work on his new book. After discussion, Milton's agent suggest he write his new book at Lucy's farmhouse. Later, when Fred catches a "mysterious man" visiting Lucy while Ricky is at work, Ricky becomes furious.

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.



#Throwback Thursday   #TBT

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Actress Natalie Portman Teaches You Hebrew Slang


How much Hebrew slang do you know? What's the real meaning of Al Hapanim, Chai B'seret, Balagan, and Zayin

In a video posted by Vanity Fair magazine, Actress Natalie Portman explains the street language meaning of these and other popular Israeli expressions.

Portman is fluent in Hebrew, having been born in Jerusalem to an Israeli father and American mother. She learned to speak Hebrew while living on Long Island and attended a Jewish elementary school, the Solomon Schechter Day School of Nassau County in Jericho, New York.

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.
 

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Dry Bones Cartoonist Yaakov Kirschen Tells Two Nixon Jokes


Yesterday we told you about Yaakov Kirschen's new series of coloring books including Jewish curses illustrated with the same humor he uses for his daily Dry Bones cartoons in The Jerusalem Post.

But Kirschen also likes to tell jokes in public. Here are a couple of jokes that he told recently relating to his personal experience on leaving the United States and making aliyah to Israel. His move came during the Nixon presidency so he calls them Nixon jokes, but they could apply just as well today.

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.


Monday, February 20, 2017

A Joke to Start the Week - "Marriage Therapy"


It's Monday again and time for another Joke to Start the Week. 

Here's the setup: After 35 years of marriage, a husband and wife went in for counseling. When asked what the problem was, the wife went into a tirade, listing every problem they had in the 35 years that they were married. And then...

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.


Sunday, February 19, 2017

Dry Bones Cartoonist Yaakov Kirschen Releases Book of Yiddish Curses


Yaakov Kirschen, the political cartoonist whose daily Dry Bones comic strips have appeared in The Jerusalem Post since January 1973, has been using his talents to present wry observations on world events especially as they relate to Israel and the Jewish people.

In addition to his cartoons, which are also published in his daily blog, Kirschen has started on a new project -- a series of Grandpa's Jewish Cartoon Coloring Books. The first two in the series are The Dry Bones Jewish Holiday Traditions Coloring Book and Jewish Curses: A Guide and Coloring Book.

We ordered both books from Amazon.com and enjoyed their funny depictions of Jewish life.
Wry Jewish humor is a feature of both books. We especially enjoyed the illustrations of the 29 Yiddish curses in the Jewish Curses book. We think it should have been titled Yiddish Curses and should have included the curses in their original language and English transliteration. We hope that Yaakov will issue an expanded and updated version with the original curses in Yiddish.

Here are two of the pages of this large format 36 page book. Enjoy!


Friday, February 17, 2017

Welcoming Shabbat with Bnei Menashe Girl Singing Adon Olam


The Bnei Menashe (sons of Manasseh) claim descent from one of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel, who were sent into exile by the Assyrian Empire more than 27 centuries ago.
Their ancestors wandered through Central Asia and the Far East for centuries, before settling in what is now northeastern India, along the border with Burma and Bangladesh.
Throughout their sojourn in exile, the Bnei Menashe continued to practice Judaism just as their ancestors did, including observing the Sabbath, keeping kosher, celebrating the festivals and following the laws of family purity. And they continued to nourish the dream of one day returning to the land of their ancestors, the Land of Israel.
To welcome Shabbat this week, we're sharing a version of Adon Olam sung by Israela Haokip, a young member of the Bnei Menashe community. 

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.



Thursday, February 16, 2017

Throwback Thursday Comedy Special: The Marx Brothers in "A Night at the Opera"


This Throwback Thursday takes us back 82 years to one of the most famous comedy scenes of all time, the ocean liner stateroom scene from the Marx Brothers' film A Night at the Opera.

It was developed with participation of silent comedy great Buster Keaton, who took inspiration from his own film, The Cameraman.  

The 1935 film also starred Kitty Carlisle and Allan Jones. It was the first film the Marx Brothers made for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer after their departure from Paramount Pictures, and the first after Zeppo left the act. The film was adapted by George S. Kaufman, Morrie Ryskind, and Al Boasberg from a story by James Kevin McGuinness. It was directed by Sam Wood.

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.



#Throwback Thursday, #TBT

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

The Great Jewish Comedians: Issy Bonn - The Famous British Comedian


Not all of the Jewish comedians were born in the USA. 

Issy Bonn (1903-1977) was a British Jewish actor, singer and comedian, most famous for his recording of My Yiddishe Momme. He appeared in two films, I Thank You in 1941 and Discoveries in 1939, where he played Mr. Schwitzer.

Bonn played on BBC Radio music shows, and in music halls before retiring to become a theatrical agent. His image appears on the cover of The Beatles album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Here's a video from 1939 with Issy doing some standup comedy and singing one of his ballads.

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.


Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Valentine's Day Special: A Jewish Grandparents' Guide to Romance

 
There always have been mixed feelings in the Jewish world about celebrating this day which originally was named in honor of Valentine, a Christian saint. And today, you can find opinions from rabbis of all Jewish denominations that approve and disapprove of its observance. 

We did some searching and found that despite some views that the holiday is foreign to Judaism and should be avoided, there are a growing number of opinions, even in the Orthodox world, that not only should the holiday be observed, but that it should be embraced.

As Rabbi Benjamin Blech, professsor of Talmud at Yeshiva University, has written about Valentine's Day on the aish.com website,
As Jews, we may not be sure whether it's proper for us to join the party. After all, for the longest time the full name of this holiday was “St. Valentine's Day” because of its legendary link with the apocryphal story of one of the earliest Christian saints. Yet academics aren't the only ones who have recognized the dubious historical basis of this connection. Vatican II, the landmark set of reforms adopted by the Catholic Church in 1969, removed Valentine's Day from the Catholic church's calendar, asserting that "though the memorial of St. Valentine is ancient… apart from his name nothing is known… except that he was buried on the Via Flaminia on 14 February."
What's left for this day, as proponents of its universal celebration declare, is something that people of all faiths may in good conscience observe: A day in which to acknowledge the power of love to make us fully human.
When I am asked as a rabbi if I think it's a good idea for Jews to celebrate Valentine's Day, my standard answer is, "Yes, we should celebrate love… every day of the year."
This year, to embrace Valentine's Day, we bring you A Jewish Grandparents' Guide to Romance, a video from The Forward. 

 Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.