Sunday, September 26, 2021

Yiddish Word of the Day: Saying Thanks

Last year the Forverts launched a daily series of short informal video clips called Yiddish Word of the Day.

The series, written and narrated by Forverts editor Rukhl Schaechter, aims to give non-Yiddish speakers an introduction to familiar Yiddish words and phrases and how they might be used in everyday situations. 

Schaechter, who was appointed the new editor of the Forverts in 2016, is the first woman to helm the paper in its 119-year history, its first editor to have been born in the United States, and likely its first editor who is shomeret Shabbat.
We posted the first of this series in May 2020. Now that the Forverts is continuing the series, we'll continue sharing some of the words and phrases as a regular feature of Jewish Humor Central.


Today Rukhl explains the many ways we have of saying "Thanks."

Enjoy!

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Friday, September 24, 2021

Welcoming Shabbat with Adon Olam by Russia's Red Army Choir in Tel Aviv

A few years ago we posted a version of Adon Olam that was sung by Russia's Red Army Choir during a concert at the Sultan's Pool in Jerusalem in 2014.

Three years later a more diverse Red Army Choir gave another rousing performance of Adon Olam in Tel Aviv with singers in military dress and a group of folk dancers in traditional costumes.

Here's a video of the 2017 performance that's the 71st version of Adon Olam that we've posted since starting Jewish Humor Central.

Enjoy, and Shabbat shalom!

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Thursday, September 23, 2021

Throwback Thursday Comedy Special: Henny Youngman on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1965

The Ed Sullivan Show was a television variety program that aired on CBS from 1948-1971. For 23 years it aired every Sunday night and played host to the world's greatest talents. 

The entertainers each week ranged from comedians like Joan Rivers and Rodney Dangerfield, to Broadway stars Julie Andrews and Richard Burton, to pop singers such as Bobby Darin and Petula Clark. 

On June 14, 1959, comedian Henny Youngman made one of his many appearances on the show. He delivers his one-liners so fast that you may have to watch the clip more than once to catch all the punch lines.

Enjoy!

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#Throwback Thursday    #TBT

Monday, September 20, 2021

Etrog After Sukkot: A Visit to Jerusalem's Medicine Man and His Etrog Remedies

Starting tomorrow we will be waving the etrog, along with the lulav, myrtle and willow branches, for the week of Sukkot. The etrog can be very expensive, costing up to and in some cases more than $100 apiece.

But what use is the etrog after the holiday is over? It depends where you are and who you are. As we enter the Sukkot holiday, let's hop over to Jerusalem's Mahane Yehuda market, where one of the shopkeepers, Uzi-Eli Chezi, is known as the Etrog medicine man.

In this video, Uzi-Eli greets a pair of American visitors and gives them instant etrog-based treatments for a variety of illnesses and skin conditions, along with a jolly laugh and a hearty welcome to Israel.

Enjoy! We'll be celebrating Sukkot tomorrow and Wednesday, returning with more Jewish Humor Central on Thursday.

Chag Sameach!

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Sunday, September 19, 2021

Yiddish Word of the Day - The Holiday of Sukkot

Last year the Forverts launched a daily series of short informal video clips called Yiddish Word of the Day.

The series, written and narrated by Forverts editor Rukhl Schaechter, aims to give non-Yiddish speakers an introduction to familiar Yiddish words and phrases and how they might be used in everyday situations. 

Schaechter, who was appointed the new editor of the Forverts in 2016, is the first woman to helm the paper in its 119-year history, its first editor to have been born in the United States, and likely its first editor who is shomeret Shabbat.
We posted the first of this series in May 2020. Now that the Forverts is continuing the series, we'll continue sharing some of the words and phrases as a regular feature of Jewish Humor Central.


Today we'll share the Yiddish words and expressions that relate to the holiday of Sukkot, which starts tomorrow night.

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.

Friday, September 17, 2021

International Stars of "Fiddler" Unite to Sing "Sabbath Prayer" as Broadway Reopens

Last week international stars of Fiddler On The Roof from productions staged all over the world, united in singing “Sabbath Prayer” in eight different languages. 

The piece was meant as a collective prayer for the safe return of Broadway and theatres everywhere -- a prayer for protection, ease, health, and a safe return of in-person gatherings, and for the relief those communal moments will bring. 

The piece was produced by Adam Kantor and Reboot and presented by OneTable and Broadway.com. It features singers from performances in English, Yiddish, Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Japanese, and Tagalog.

Shabbat shalom!

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Getting in the Mood for Yom Kippur with Avinu Malkeinu by Hazamir Choir

Avinu Malkeinu is one of the central themes of Yom Kippur, which Jews worldwide will be observing tonight and tomorrow.

We're getting in the mood for Yom Kippur by sharing a version of Avinu Malkeinu composed by Max Janowski, sung by Hazamir at their 2016 Gala Concert at Carnegie Hall. 

The choir was conducted by Hadas Sturman, Conductor of HaZamir Beit She'an and accompanied by Dr. Alan Mason, Conductor of HaZamir Miami. Soloists were Allison Abrams, HaZamir Manhattan, Juliana Lynch, HaZamir Baltimore, Yohji Daquio-Braude, HaZamir Providence, and Samuel Dylan Rosner, HaZamir Westchester. HaZamir: The International Jewish Teen Choir is a program of the Zamir Choral Foundation, www.zamirchoralfoundation.org.

We'll be posting again on Friday. We wish you a G'mar Chatima Tova and a happy and healthy New Year.

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

Tumbalalaika Around the World: A Yiddish Jazz Version by Sharon Brauner in Leipzig, Germany

The Yiddish folk love song Tumbalalaika originated in Eastern Europe in the 19th century, but its exact origin is hard to pinpoint. That hasn't prevented it from being sung and played over and over, not only in places where Yiddish songs are sung, but just about everywhere in the world, in vocal and instrumental versions, in cabarets and in the movies.

Just as we have followed
the songs Hava Nagila, Adon Olam, Hevenu Shalom Aleichem, and Abanibi as they took different forms as interpreted by a wide variety of singers, musicians, and dancers, we're continuing the series today that we started back in 2012, bringing you many interpretations of this universal courting and love song. 

The company J. Ariowitsch was one of the leading companies in the Leipzig smoked goods trade in the Weimar Republic. Now their building is a center for Jewish culture in Germany. Numerous cultural events, concert and reading series, exhibitions, lectures and seminars take place here every year.

Last week Sharon Brauner, Karsten Troyke, Daniel Weltlinger & Harry Ermer performed a live concert of Jewish music at Ariowitsch-Haus in Leipzig, including their version of Tumbalalaika.

Born in West Berlin in 1969, Brauner attended a musical school and took a job as a bouncer, bartender, and go-go dancer in Berlin's trendy clubs. Then she studied acting at the Lee Strasberg institute in New York while singing jazz standards at night in various clubs.

Brauner launched a singing career, and dedicated herself to popularizing Yiddish classics that she knew from her childhood. She reinterpreted the songs, some of which are centuries old, in swing, jazz and pop, Balkan polka, Arab arabesques, South American rhythms, reggae, waltz, country, and tango elements. The songs captured the joy and the soul of the music.

Enjoy!

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Monday, September 13, 2021

A Joke to Start the Week - "Beryl, Cheryl, and Shmeryl"

It's another Monday and time for another Joke to Start the Week. Today Mickey Greenblatt is back with another good one.

Marshal (Mickey) Greenblatt received degrees from Columbia (BA and BS in Flight Sciences), a DC from Von Karman Institute (1963) and his PhD from Princeton in Aerospace Sciences. He worked as a researcher for NASA and the Naval Research Laboratory. 

With four other scientists, he founded Fusion Systems Corporation, which invented microwave-powered UV lamps for drying coatings. He founded and served on the boards of technology companies and is active in volunteer work. He served on the executive committee of the Jewish Council for the Aging of Greater Washington for many years.

Mickey also loves Jewish jokes and sent us this one to share with you. Here's the setup: Three young men in Poland -- Beryl, Cheryl, and Shmeryl -- have a friend Moshe who emigrated to the United States. He became a very successful businessman. And then...

Enjoy!

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Sunday, September 12, 2021

Yiddish Word of the Day: Cutlery in Jewish Life

Last year the Forverts launched a daily series of short informal video clips called Yiddish Word of the Day.

The series, written and narrated by Forverts editor Rukhl Schaechter, aims to give non-Yiddish speakers an introduction to familiar Yiddish words and phrases and how they might be used in everyday situations. 

Schaechter, who was appointed the new editor of the Forverts in 2016, is the first woman to helm the paper in its 119-year history, its first editor to have been born in the United States, and likely its first editor who is shomeret Shabbat.
We posted the first of this series in May 2020. Now that the Forverts is continuing the series, we'll continue sharing some of the words and phrases as a regular feature of Jewish Humor Central.


Today we'll share the Yiddish words for cutlery that we use every day and learn about the mixing spoon that's not only a cooking utensil.

Enjoy!

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Friday, September 10, 2021

Welcoming Shabbat with a Yiddish Translation of a Classic Jimmy Buffett Song

We never expected to put the words Yiddish, Shabbat, and Jimmy Buffett in the same sentence. But last week a funny video with just this combination started spreading on the Internet and already has 7,500 views.

Rokhl Kafrissen, the columnist and playwright, translated a Jimmy Buffet classic song with the family-friendly shortened title of Let's Get Drunk into Yiddish.

As Jessica Steinberg wrote in The Times of Israel,

The Margaritaville Resort Times Square — part of Buffett’s hospitality company, which manages and franchises restaurants, stores and casinos named for the singer’s hit song, “Margaritaville” — is located at the center of Manhattan’s garment district.

The neighborhood once housed three synagogues serving the many Yiddish-speaking garment industry workers. While most of the textile businesses no longer exist, the historic Garment Center Congregation is now on the ground floor and two sub-floors of the Margaritaville entertainment complex, part of a complicated real estate negotiation.

In honor of that unusual situation, Yiddish culture nonprofit Congress for Jewish Culture commissioned playwright Rokhl Kafrissen to adapt Buffett’s tale of a man’s bar hookup into a woman’s Yiddish plea to skip Shabbat dinner and go right to dessert.

The song is performed by a formidable crew of klezmer performers: Sasha Lurje (voice), Craig Judelman (violin) and Lorin Sklamberg (guitar, voice). 

Enjoy, and Shabbat Shalom!

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Thursday, September 9, 2021

Throwback Thursday Comedy Showcase: Jack Benny Tells a Scandinavian Story on Laugh-In

Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In was one of the most popular TV shows in the 1960s and 1970s. One of their regular segments was Story Time. In this segment, Jack Benny is asked to tell a story for a Scandinavian audience. When he protests that he can't speak Scandinavian, the hosts provide him with a Scandinavian translator played by hilarious comedian Arte Johnson.

Benny starts telling the story that's instantly translated by Johnson into a gobbledegook parody of Scandinavian speech. The sketch also provides an opportunity for Ruth Buzzi to hit Benny with her pocketbook, a regular feature of her skits with Johnson.

Ah, the memories that this skit brings back! Enjoy!

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#Throwback Thursday     #TBT

Monday, September 6, 2021

Wishing All of Our Readers a Shanah Tovah - Happy New Year 5782


Thanks to our thousands of loyal subscribers and casual readers worldwide who have joined us during the year.


We started this blog on October 5, 2009 and it's been going strong with more than 3600 blog entries and more than 3 million page views over the last 12 years.  

We appreciate your loyalty and we hope to keep bringing you a daily mix of Jewish humor in all of its forms -- traditional, eclectic, musical, unbelievable but true, and just funny, tempered with touches of nostalgia and Yiddishe nachas. 

We'll be attending Rosh Hashanah services remotely tonight, Tuesday and Wednesday, and we'll be back posting again on Thursday.  Here's wishing you a happy, healthy, joyous, prosperous and funny New Year from our family to yours!

L'shanah Tovah Tikatevu v'techatemu!

Sunday, September 5, 2021

Remembering Mal Z. Lawrence - King of Catskills Comedy

Last week the world of Jewish humor lost one of its greatest stars with the death of Mal Z. Lawrence, one of our favorite comedians, who brought Borscht Belt comedy and waves of laughter to Jewish audiences in the Catskills, South Florida, Las Vegas, and Midtown Manhattan.

As Neil Genzlinger wrote in The New York Times,

Mr. Lawrence came to prominence in the Catskills in the 1950s but was soon known all over the country, playing Las Vegas, Atlantic City, Florida and other stops on the comedy circuit, where his brand of relatively mild Jewish-tinged humor was greeted enthusiastically. To a Florida audience he might joke about the Catskills; to a Northern audience, he’d poke fun at Florida.

Manny Miller was born on Sept. 2, 1932, in the Bronx and grew up there. “Mal Z. Lawrence,” as he variously told the story over the years, was the suggestion of an early agent, or perhaps several different agents. “Lawrence” was borrowed from a Long Island village where he was appearing. As for the Z, which stood for nothing, “My agent told me I’d get more marquee space,” he said.

As a tribute to Mal, we're sharing a video clip of one of his classic performances. Enjoy! 

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Friday, September 3, 2021

Welcoming Shabbat with Yigdal by Cantor Avi Davis and the Ohabei Shalom Choir

Temple Ohabei Shalom, “Lovers of Peace,” has been at the center of New England Judaism since it was founded in 1842 as the first congregation in Massachusetts. As an affiliate of the Union for Reform Judaism, the Brookline congregation encourages people from all paths of Judaism to be a part of its community.

In this video, Cantor Avi Davis and the Ohabei Shalom choir sing David Sparr's arrangement of Yigdal, the liturgical poem that many congregations sing at the end of Friday night services.

Enjoy, and Shabbat shalom!

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Thursday, September 2, 2021

Throwback Thursday Comedy Showcase: Sid Caesar in "Meeting Girlfriend's Parents" on Ed Sullivan Show

It's another Throwback Thursday and time to turn the calendar back 56 years to one of Sid Caesar's appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Caesar was considered a "sketch comic" and actor, as opposed to a stand-up comedian. He also relied more on body language, accents, and facial contortions than simply dialogue. Unlike the slapstick comedy which was standard on TV, his style was considered "avant garde" in the 1950s. He conjured up ideas and scene and used writers to flesh out the concept and create the dialogue.

In this sketch on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1965, Caesar played the part of a suitor meeting his girlfriend's stuffy parents for the first time, an encounter in which anything that could go wrong, did.

Enjoy!

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  #Throwback Thursday     #TBT

Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Remembering Ed Asner and His First Performance -- A Failed Bar Mitzvah Reading

Ed Asner, the burly and prolific actor who became a star in middle age as the gruff but lovable newsman Lou Grant, first in the hit comedy “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” and later in the drama “Lou Grant,” died Sunday. He was 91.

As reported in The Times of Israel,

Asner was born in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1929, to Orthodox Jewish parents, Lizzie Seliger and Morris David Asner, who had immigrated from the Soviet Union. He was given the Hebrew name Yitzhak.

He almost became a newsman in real life. He studied journalism at the University of Chicago until a professor told him there was little money to be made in the profession.

He quickly switched to drama, debuting as the martyred Thomas Becket in a campus production of T.S. Eliot’s “Murder in the Cathedral.”

As Grant aged, many of his characters were more explicitly Jewish, from Joe Danzig, a worn-out principal at a troubled inner-city high school in “The Bronx Zoo,” in 1988, to Sid Weinberg, the abusive stepfather in the recent “Karate Kid” reboot, “Cobra Kai.”

Asner was interviewed as part of the Yiddish Book Center's Wexler Oral History Project. In an excerpt from the interview, he described his harrowing first performance -- his Bar Mitzvah, where he was criticized by his father and his uncle. Having failed his first performance, he became determined to be an actor.

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Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Israel's Magic Mushrooms Lead the Way in Psychedelic Medicine

Israel has quietly become one of the world leaders in the research and use of medicinal psychedelics. In Israel there is a company called PsyRx that is leading research in psychedelic medicine.

As Brian Blum wrote in Israel21c,

With military service mandatory and conflicts breaking out every few years, most Israeli families have experience with PTSD. There’s also trauma in communities near the Gaza border that are under regular but unpredictable rocket attack. 

In early 2019, Israel became the first government worldwide to approve a “Compassionate Use” program for MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. The United States followed Israel’s lead when the FDA approved limited MDMA therapy in December 2019.

This video shows the lab trying to produce psychoactive compounds in fungi. Mushrooms can help with conditions like anxiety or PTSD. The PsyRx lab focuses on developing mushrooms that help with depression.

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Monday, August 30, 2021

A Joke to Start the Week: "Luck of the Jews"

It's another Monday, and time for another Joke to Start the Week. Today we're bringing you another joke told by David Apfel.

Now living in Modiin, Israel, David Apfel is an accomplished entertainer and chazzan. He sings in several languages with repertoire ranging from the musicals to opera. He has officiated internationally at several orthodox synagogues and he also specializes in ''Kosher Komedie''.

Here's the setup for today's joke: A long time ago in the Soviet Union in a very severe winter, there was a long line of people waiting to buy food. And then...

Enjoy!

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Sunday, August 29, 2021

Yiddish Word of the Day: "The Computer"

Last year the Forverts launched a daily series of short informal video clips called Yiddish Word of the Day.

The series, written and narrated by Forverts editor Rukhl Schaechter, aims to give non-Yiddish speakers an introduction to familiar Yiddish words and phrases and how they might be used in everyday situations. 

Schaechter, who was appointed the new editor of the Forverts in 2016, is the first woman to helm the paper in its 119-year history, its first editor to have been born in the United States, and likely its first editor who is shomeret Shabbat.
We posted the first of this series in May 2020. Now that the Forverts is continuing the series, we'll continue sharing some of the words and phrases as a regular feature of Jewish Humor Central.


Today's subject is the computer and the many expressions that result from its use.

Enjoy!

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Friday, August 27, 2021

Welcoming Shabbat with Lecha Dodi Modzitz Medley by Colin Schachat and Avreimi Roth

Since we started sharing various Shabbat melodies in our Friday posts, we've included 43 versions of Lecha Dodi, the central liturgical poem in the Kabbalat Shabbat service. 
 
While all versions are worthy of emulating, so far none has been as ebullient and joyful as the one we're sharing today.It's a medley of Modzitz melodies for Lecha Dodi sung by with orchestra and choir arranged and conducted by Maestro Ofir Sobol from Colin Schachat's album The Cantorial Collection.

South African born Colin Schachat has established himself internationally both as a renowned baritone and cantor. He performs a wide range of popular repertoire including Broadway, Yiddish, Opera, Chassidic, Israeli, Italian and Spanish songs.
 
Avremi Roth, who is often associated with his deep and powerful voice, has recently changed his musical style and released a number of recent pop hits that have been a resounding success on radio stations and playlists. “I would not say that I have really changed my style,” Avremi Roth points out. “I just make the necessary adjustments to the current musical style and put out songs that will also suit the current era. But the authentic cantorial cantata and music are still ingrained in my soul forever.”
 
Enjoy, and Shabbat shalom!
 
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Thursday, August 26, 2021

Throwback Thursday Comedy Special: Smith and Dale - "Tax Consultant and Avoiding Taxes"

It's another Throwback Thursday and today we're turning the calendar back 54 years to an appearance by the comedy team of Smith and Dale on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Joe Smith (originally Joseph Seltzer) and Charlie Dale (originally Charles Marks) grew up in the Jewish ghettos of New York City. Many of the famous comic performers of vaudeville, radio and movies came from the same place and the same era, including Gallagher and Shean, George Burns, Eddie Cantor, George Jessel and The Marx Brothers. 

Seltzer and Marks met as teenagers in 1898 and formed a partnership. They named their act "Smith and Dale" because a local printer gave them a good deal on business cards reading "Smith and Dale" (intended for a vaudeville team that had dissolved). Joe Seltzer became Joe Smith, and Charlie Marks became Charlie Dale.

During the 1920s, they became famous for their signature sketch "Doctor Kronkheit and His Only Living Patient," which like "Who's on First?" for Abbott and Costello, became one of the famous comedy sketches of the 20th century. The name of the doctor is an inside joke: Smith and Dale, both being Jewish, named the physician Kronkheit, which is Yiddish and German for "sickness". Thus we have a doctor named "Dr. Sickness". Indeed a hospital in German is called a Krankenhaus, or literally "sick house".

In today's skit, Joe Smith goes to see tax consultant Charlie Dale for help in avoiding taxes.

Enjoy!

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   #Throwback Thursday     #TBT

Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Comedy Showcase: Avi Hoffman's "Too Jewish, Too! - Welcome To The Catskills"

At age 10 Avi Hoffman (born Avrum Ber, in 1958) made his theatrical debut in a Yiddish Folksbiene Theater production called Bronx Express. In the decades that followed, the performer, a son of Holocaust survivors, has appeared in a wide range of theatrical endeavors, both in New York City and regionally.

Avi is the CEO of the Yiddishkayt Initiative, a not-for-profit organization that celebrates and promotes Jewish history, life, and culture and their positive and far-reaching impact on the world. From performing arts, publishing, and education to language, philosophy, and literature, YI offers a global clearinghouse of Jewish culture and entertainment. 

Avi is known for his shows, Too Jewish and Too Jewish Too. Today we're sharing Welcome to the Catskills, an excerpt from Avi's second show Too Jewish, Too. Enjoy! 

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Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Hava Nagila Around the World - With Shofar Intro by Folkadu with Yael Gat

Folkadu is an ensemble which takes us on a musical journey from traditional Jewish tunes to Israeli folk songs, sung in diverse Jewish languages such as Hebrew, Yiddish and Ladino, accompanied by a unique instrument combination of trumpet, accordion and oud. 

Hava Nagila (Hebrew: "הבה נגילה"‎, "Let us rejoice") is an Israeli folk song traditionally sung at Jewish celebrations. The melody is based on a Hassidic Nigun, composed in 1915 in Ottoman Palestine, when Hebrew was being revived as a spoken language for the first time in almost 2,000 years. 

We are now in the middle of the Hebrew month of Elul. As Rosh Hashanah approaches, it's traditional to blow the shofar each day of the month. By doing so, inevitably we’ll feel remorse over past misdeeds and set ourselves upon a fresh new path. We don't think that the rabbis who started this tradition had it in mind as a prelude to Hava Nagila, but why not take Yael Gat's interpretation as a foretaste of the coming holidays? 

Folkadu are: Yael Gat - Shofar & Trumpet 

Pier Paolo Bertoli - Acoordion 

Doron Furman - Oud

Performance at Berlin Music Festival 2021 

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.

Monday, August 23, 2021

A Joke to Start the Week - "Chauffeur Rabbi"

It's another Monday and time for another Joke to Start the Week. Today Mickey Greenblatt is back with another good one.

Marshal (Mickey) Greenblatt received degrees from Columbia (BA and BS in Flight Sciences), a DC from Von Karman Institute (1963) and his PhD from Princeton in Aerospace Sciences. He worked as a researcher for NASA and the Naval Research Laboratory. 

With four other scientists, he founded Fusion Systems Corporation, which invented microwave-powered UV lamps for drying coatings. He founded and served on the boards of technology companies and is active in volunteer work. He served on the executive committee of the Jewish Council for the Aging of Greater Washington for many years.

Mickey also loves Jewish jokes and sent us this one to share with you. Here's the setup: A renowned rabbi is scheduled to lead a discussion in a strange town. He's tired and so he says to the chauffeur who drives him to all of these lectures: "You know, I'm not up to leading the discussion tonight."  And then...

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.