Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Welcoming 2019 with Auld Lang Syne in Yiddish 4-Part Harmony


The start of a new year has long been associated with Auld Lang Syne. The Scottish song, based on a poem by Robert Burns in 1788, is sung to ring in the New Year as people cross arms to hold hands in a circle. 

The phrase “auld lang syne” literally translates to “old long since,” and basically means, “days gone by.” The original, five-verse version of the poem essentially gets people singing, “lets drink to days gone by”—an appropriate toast for the New Year. 

This year the song can be sung in Yiddish thanks to a YouTube post of the Jewish People's Philharmonic Chorus singing it in four part harmony.

The Yiddish lyrics and choral arrangement are by Binyumen Schaechter who also conducted the performance at the Merkin Concert Hall in New York on October 14. Seth Weinstein provided the piano accompaniment.

We are fortunate to be able to wish our friends and families a Happy New Year twice each year, on Rosh Hashanah and today, the secular New Year's Day.

Enjoy!

A SPECIAL NOTE FOR NEW EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS:  THE VIDEO MAY NOT BE VIEWABLE DIRECTLY FROM THE EMAIL THAT YOU GET EACH DAY ON SOME COMPUTERS AND TABLETS.  YOU MUST CLICK ON THE TITLE AT THE TOP OF THE EMAIL TO REACH THE JEWISH HUMOR CENTRAL WEBSITE, FROM WHICH YOU CLICK ON THE PLAY BUTTON IN THE VIDEO IMAGE TO START THE VIDEO.